Even sloping points

Discuss the science of figuring out our prey through good detective work.
blizzardhunter
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Even sloping points

Unread postby blizzardhunter » Thu Mar 07, 2013 4:36 pm

I posted a map the other day and you guys helped show where you thought buck beds would be. I'm going scounting this Saturday, and because I don't have as much time as I'd like, am going to a different area I can get into quicker and be have more time scouting. The place I'm going isnt as steep in most places and the only topo maps I can find are 20' contour lines. That being said, there isnt as much detail. Most of the points gently break over and have an even slope all the way to the bottom. The beds Dan listed on my other map he said were chosen because where a bend in the contour coincided with a drop in the terrain. I'll try to get a map posted as an example but I'm trying to figure out where to start. If the points come off a ridgeline and it keeps the same slope all the way down where should I look for beds. O know from trail cams bucks are bedding there. The bottom is at 400ft of elevation and the tops 500 to 520ft on average. Should I try to walk the entire point or try looking around the 2/3 mark of elevation. Like I said I'll try to get a pic up tomorrow.


dan
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Re: Even sloping points

Unread postby dan » Thu Mar 07, 2013 8:29 pm

I would look for beds within the top 1/3 of the ridge... Small ridges, and sloping ridges still get bedding. Some of the farmland I HUNT IN SOUTHEAST WI is rolling hills and elevation changes might only be 20 to 50 feet and you still get the buck bedding similar to the higher hills... Also look at the lowest elevations... HIGHEST AND LOWEST ELEVATIONS...
Not quite at the top of the hill, and not quite under water. but highest and lowest deserves a glance while your out scouting.
blizzardhunter
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Re: Even sloping points

Unread postby blizzardhunter » Fri Mar 08, 2013 5:52 am

By the lowest elevation I'm assuming you mean where the point first starts to form coming up from the bottom. Also, since the thermals wont be as much of an advantage in that type terrain would the bucks also relate more to cover on the point?
dan
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Re: Even sloping points

Unread postby dan » Fri Mar 08, 2013 7:18 am

By lowest elevations I meant a long way away from the points and hills, just above water level.
Farmland and some hill country wooded areas consist of marshy low areas and hills. Scout the highest, scout the lowest.

Thermals still work for the deer on small rolling hills... I can think of a bedding area on a ridge that is only about 10 or 15 feet higher than the valley. When the wind blows over the top I can drop a milkweed at my knee and it will follow the ground up to the beds, but drop it head level and watch the wind carry it the other way...
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Re: Even sloping points

Unread postby Redman232 » Fri Mar 08, 2013 9:04 am

Scent pooling (thermals) can occur in breaks and holes in thick cover in flat terrain. I've observed several staging areas in flat terrain that are in thick cover and you can tell exactly where the buck stands, by tracks, fresh browsing evidence and scat. Toss a milk weed seed out and watch as it drops in the holes in the cover (in the evening). Swirling wind currents is also usually a characteristic of these areas from my observation (makes them tough to hunt). The first time I witnessed this, a light bulb turned on in my mind. I guess what I'm trying to say is definitely don't dismiss thermals in flatter terrain.
blizzardhunter
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Re: Even sloping points

Unread postby blizzardhunter » Fri Mar 08, 2013 2:36 pm

We don't have marshes where I'm at but there is the occasional slough. One question with them. A lot of sloughs here have extremely soft bottoms. Some so soft they can't be waded. If the mud is soft where say I'm sinking atleast 10 or 12 inches in mud will a deer walk through that. It seems their narrow feet would sink worse, or they wouldnt feel comfortable in it. If they were bedded around that and had to try and escape it looks like it would be difficult. Have you seen anything like that?
dan
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Re: Even sloping points

Unread postby dan » Fri Mar 08, 2013 9:17 pm

blizzardhunter wrote:We don't have marshes where I'm at but there is the occasional slough. One question with them. A lot of sloughs here have extremely soft bottoms. Some so soft they can't be waded. If the mud is soft where say I'm sinking atleast 10 or 12 inches in mud will a deer walk through that. It seems their narrow feet would sink worse, or they wouldnt feel comfortable in it. If they were bedded around that and had to try and escape it looks like it would be difficult. Have you seen anything like that?

We have areas in the swamps and marshes where the muck is very deep... Deer float and are actually hopping on there bellies in these areas.
blizzardhunter
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Re: Even sloping points

Unread postby blizzardhunter » Wed Mar 13, 2013 1:21 pm

The area I hunt is basically long ridgelines with points everywhere. The ridge tops are narrow in the sesne that there is not a big flat on top. Its big woods with little to no fields. All things being equal would bucks bed more on the points that have steeper drops? I know its kind of a loaded question but with so many points everywhere I'm trying to play the odds and narrow down to the most likely spots. There are constantly points dropping off both sides of the ridgelines. So should the points that have a steep drop provide a better windtunnel effect, therefore a better bedding area than a point next to it that has an even gentler slope?


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