What’s so hard to understand?!

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funderburk
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Re: What’s so hard to understand?!

Unread postby funderburk » Mon Feb 25, 2019 3:12 pm

Lockdown wrote:That not all buck beds are created equal. It takes more than a good looking bed and a few rubs to make it hunt worthy. Most guys find a bed with a rub in it and get all antsy in their pantsy (I did when I first started) ;) but realistically a bed can look pretty worn with fairly minimal use. If a buck lays in it once or twice a month, and one decides to leave a rub, it’s going to make you lick your chops.

The best bedding areas have rubs from multiple years and lots of beds. The bedding areas that get used very consistently... those are the beds you want to concentrate on. And even then when you hunt the best it’s fairly common to not see anything. It’s all part of the game.

I would say I’m to the point where 10-20% of the buck beds I find get hunted. It takes a few years to really understand what you’re looking at. I’m certainly not “there” yet, but definitely better than when I started.

The best bedding areas I’ve found are hard to hunt. And that’s why they’re the best. Figuring out how to hunt them effectively might take some trial and error.

Learning Beast techniques is definitely a marathon and not a sprint. Pay attention to all the little details and KEEP AN OPEN MIND. The information you read here and watch in videos are guidelines, not gospel.

In 3-5 years you’ll be in pretty good shape as long as you’re putting forth the effort.


I finally found a bedding AREA worth throwing a sit or two at. And you’re right, this spot makes the other beds I’ve found that I was once so excited about seem, well...eh. You truly know the good ones when you see them. I’ve heard y’all say that plenty of times and it finally happened and it’s SO true.


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Re: What’s so hard to understand?!

Unread postby xpauliber » Mon Feb 25, 2019 3:14 pm

Lockdown wrote:
JAK wrote:
Lockdown wrote:That not all buck beds are created equal. It takes more than a good looking bed and a few rubs to make it hunt worthy. Most guys find a bed with a rub in it and get all antsy in their pantsy (I did when I first started) ;) but realistically a bed can look pretty worn with fairly minimal use. If a buck lays in it once or twice a month, and one decides to leave a rub, it’s going to make you lick your chops.

The best bedding areas have rubs from multiple years and lots of beds. The bedding areas that get used very consistently... those are the beds you want to concentrate on. And even then when you hunt the best it’s fairly common to not see anything. It’s all part of the game.

I would say I’m to the point where 10-20% of the buck beds I find get hunted. It takes a few years to really understand what you’re looking at. I’m certainly not “there” yet, but definitely better than when I started.

The best bedding areas I’ve found are hard to hunt. And that’s why they’re the best. Figuring out how to hunt them effectively might take some trial and error.

Learning Beast techniques is definitely a marathon and not a sprint. Pay attention to all the little details and KEEP AN OPEN MIND. The information you read here and watch in videos are guidelines, not gospel.

In 3-5 years you’ll be in pretty good shape as long as you’re putting forth the effort.

I would agree there. Probly 15 % of the spots ive scouted a truley worth hunting and i can see how a new beast cant let those type of spots string them along. I know when i first started i found a few beds and salavated at the mouth. But then thought to myself got to be better spots then this. And when u find one you know. Only way to find them is scout scout scout.


I agree.

A guy definitely doesn’t want to run out, find a bunch of spots you think are “good enough” then stop scouting if it’s still pre-green up. At the same time, if there’s a bed(ding area) that you aren’t sure is hunt worthy, I’d lean towards hunting it. Is the hunter stringing himself along on mediocre bedding? Maybe, maybe not.

It comes back to the instant gratification stuff that others have mentioned previously in this thread. A guy has to put his time in.

There’s nothing wrong with hunting a few questionable spots! That’s how you learn. Before long you’ll recognize that similar spots are mediocre and you can pass them by and not feel bad about it. I’ve said it a hundred times on the forum... any time you can answer a question, that’s a positive. I can’t stand questioning things. I want the answer and I want it now.

That said, Jak your 2nd to last sentence is spot on. “When you find one, you know.”. The good stuff should really get you excited. It will make perfect sense on an aerial, AND in the field.


And most times when "you know", you'll know because you'll be scratching your head thinking "this spot is impenetrable. How the heck am I going to hunt this thing, he has every advantage!" That's how you'll know and that's why he's there. :mrgreen:
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Re: What’s so hard to understand?!

Unread postby tgreeno » Mon Feb 25, 2019 3:17 pm

Lockdown wrote:
JAK wrote:
Lockdown wrote:That not all buck beds are created equal. It takes more than a good looking bed and a few rubs to make it hunt worthy. Most guys find a bed with a rub in it and get all antsy in their pantsy (I did when I first started) ;) but realistically a bed can look pretty worn with fairly minimal use. If a buck lays in it once or twice a month, and one decides to leave a rub, it’s going to make you lick your chops.

The best bedding areas have rubs from multiple years and lots of beds. The bedding areas that get used very consistently... those are the beds you want to concentrate on. And even then when you hunt the best it’s fairly common to not see anything. It’s all part of the game.

I would say I’m to the point where 10-20% of the buck beds I find get hunted. It takes a few years to really understand what you’re looking at. I’m certainly not “there” yet, but definitely better than when I started.

The best bedding areas I’ve found are hard to hunt. And that’s why they’re the best. Figuring out how to hunt them effectively might take some trial and error.

Learning Beast techniques is definitely a marathon and not a sprint. Pay attention to all the little details and KEEP AN OPEN MIND. The information you read here and watch in videos are guidelines, not gospel.

In 3-5 years you’ll be in pretty good shape as long as you’re putting forth the effort.

I would agree there. Probly 15 % of the spots ive scouted a truley worth hunting and i can see how a new beast cant let those type of spots string them along. I know when i first started i found a few beds and salavated at the mouth. But then thought to myself got to be better spots then this. And when u find one you know. Only way to find them is scout scout scout.


I agree.

A guy definitely doesn’t want to run out, find a bunch of spots you think are “good enough” then stop scouting if it’s still pre-green up. At the same time, if there’s a bed(ding area) that you aren’t sure is hunt worthy, I’d lean towards hunting it. Is the hunter stringing himself along on mediocre bedding? Maybe, maybe not.

It comes back to the instant gratification stuff that others have mentioned previously in this thread. A guy has to put his time in.

There’s nothing wrong with hunting a few questionable spots! That’s how you learn. Before long you’ll recognize that similar spots are mediocre and you can pass them by and not feel bad about it. I’ve said it a hundred times on the forum... any time you can answer a question, that’s a positive. I can’t stand questioning things. I want the answer and I want it now.

That said, Jak your 2nd to last sentence is spot on. “When you find one, you know.”. The good stuff should really get you excited. It will make perfect sense on an aerial, AND in the field.


Good stuff guys...Focus on your best stuff! Make sure there are mature bucks using them!
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Re: What’s so hard to understand?!

Unread postby BBH1980 » Mon Feb 25, 2019 3:40 pm

Another great thread !!!
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Re: What’s so hard to understand?!

Unread postby Dewey » Mon Feb 25, 2019 3:49 pm

Don’t expect this stuff to happen overnight. Most of us “veterans” have been at this a lifetime and still are nowhere near being experts.

Also if you do kill a few bucks don’t start getting a big head. Once you think you have it figured out they have a knack for bringing you crashing back down to earth again. Never think you know it all and always strive to be a student no matter how many kills you have or how old you are.
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Re: What’s so hard to understand?!

Unread postby BBH1980 » Mon Feb 25, 2019 4:20 pm

Being very new the only thing I can add for others that are new is my outlook. My goal is to learn all I can from more experienced guys and through my own experiences with this and have FUN doing it. Success will come with time and patience. There is no substitute for experience in doing this. The forum and Dan's DVDs and podcasts give one heck of a foundation and starting point. But at the end of the day you really do have to pay your dues.... No one starts at the top in anything life has to offer. Gotta work your way there.
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Re: What’s so hard to understand?!

Unread postby funderburk » Mon Feb 25, 2019 9:08 pm

BBH1980 wrote:Being very new the only thing I can add for others that are new is my outlook. My goal is to learn all I can from more experienced guys and through my own experiences with this and have FUN doing it. Success will come with time and patience. There is no substitute for experience in doing this. The forum and Dan's DVDs and podcasts give one heck of a foundation and starting point. But at the end of the day you really do have to pay your dues.... No one starts at the top in anything life has to offer. Gotta work your way there.


Well said.
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Re: What’s so hard to understand?!

Unread postby elk yinzer » Tue Feb 26, 2019 12:42 am

It's work. Sweat equity. You can pick up a few of the concepts reading on the john. Maybe pick up some new lingo watching vids. But you still have to pound the pavement and wear some boots out. Apply specifics to your terrain. Put the hours into it. In all conditions. The most revered public land hunters are by and large the ones that put the most time into it.
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Re: What’s so hard to understand?!

Unread postby DaveT1963 » Tue Feb 26, 2019 3:03 am

I am with PK here - not any one thing but lots of little things. I guess my #1 rule is to find where other hunters do not go - I spend a lot of time scouting each Jan-Mar and I eliminate a lot of ground based on hunter sign.
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Re: What’s so hard to understand?!

Unread postby greenhorndave » Tue Feb 26, 2019 3:36 am

Lockdown wrote:
JAK wrote:
Lockdown wrote:That not all buck beds are created equal. It takes more than a good looking bed and a few rubs to make it hunt worthy. Most guys find a bed with a rub in it and get all antsy in their pantsy (I did when I first started) ;) but realistically a bed can look pretty worn with fairly minimal use. If a buck lays in it once or twice a month, and one decides to leave a rub, it’s going to make you lick your chops.

The best bedding areas have rubs from multiple years and lots of beds. The bedding areas that get used very consistently... those are the beds you want to concentrate on. And even then when you hunt the best it’s fairly common to not see anything. It’s all part of the game.

I would say I’m to the point where 10-20% of the buck beds I find get hunted. It takes a few years to really understand what you’re looking at. I’m certainly not “there” yet, but definitely better than when I started.

The best bedding areas I’ve found are hard to hunt. And that’s why they’re the best. Figuring out how to hunt them effectively might take some trial and error.

Learning Beast techniques is definitely a marathon and not a sprint. Pay attention to all the little details and KEEP AN OPEN MIND. The information you read here and watch in videos are guidelines, not gospel.

In 3-5 years you’ll be in pretty good shape as long as you’re putting forth the effort.

I would agree there. Probly 15 % of the spots ive scouted a truley worth hunting and i can see how a new beast cant let those type of spots string them along. I know when i first started i found a few beds and salavated at the mouth. But then thought to myself got to be better spots then this. And when u find one you know. Only way to find them is scout scout scout.


I agree.

A guy definitely doesn’t want to run out, find a bunch of spots you think are “good enough” then stop scouting if it’s still pre-green up. At the same time, if there’s a bed(ding area) that you aren’t sure is hunt worthy, I’d lean towards hunting it. Is the hunter stringing himself along on mediocre bedding? Maybe, maybe not.

It comes back to the instant gratification stuff that others have mentioned previously in this thread. A guy has to put his time in.

There’s nothing wrong with hunting a few questionable spots! That’s how you learn. Before long you’ll recognize that similar spots are mediocre and you can pass them by and not feel bad about it. I’ve said it a hundred times on the forum... any time you can answer a question, that’s a positive. I can’t stand questioning things. I want the answer and I want it now.

That said, Jak your 2nd to last sentence is spot on. “When you find one, you know.”. The good stuff should really get you excited. It will make perfect sense on an aerial, AND in the field.


The best bed I ever found was not visible on an aerial. It was a point into the cats that was almost imperceptible from the aerial. But like you said, once you saw it, all the tumblers fell into place and my brain-lock opened. The current occupant of the bed had little rubs in it, but there were larger older rubs in it too. It was a total mess to get to, even though it wasn't far off a road. I don't know if I'll see a big guy there, but I will try it. It was primary bedding.

I've pounded a lot of other ground and haven't found anything that good yet, although the snow and ice is obscuring the picture right now.

So here's a question, particularly for Lockdown, who is getting hammered with snow: Assuming snow cover of less than 8 inches, would you still go out and scout it, or wait for thaw? I'm seeing stuff that could be decent bedding, but it's under ice right now.

I feel like I'm getting the lay of the land scouting in Feb in SE WI, but I don't feel confident about nailing a specific bed. Rough areas, yes, but prime bed? No. I might not be in right spots either, but the conditions are leaving potentially more questions than answers.
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Re: What’s so hard to understand?!

Unread postby BBH1980 » Tue Feb 26, 2019 3:53 am

DaveT1963 wrote:I am with PK here - not any one thing but lots of little things. I guess my #1 rule is to find where other hunters do not go - I spend a lot of time scouting each Jan-Mar and I eliminate a lot of ground based on hunter sign.



I follow a lot of what you post. To me it makes a lot of sense what you say. I have been finding a lot of hunter sign my question is how far are you going away from areas that you find other hunter sign ?
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Re: What’s so hard to understand?!

Unread postby SidewayZ » Tue Feb 26, 2019 4:00 am

Confidence & Work

First put the work in and the results will speak for themselves.

Have the confidence that you can do it and get out of your routine or comfort zone.
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Re: What’s so hard to understand?!

Unread postby DaveT1963 » Tue Feb 26, 2019 4:06 am

BBH1980 wrote:
DaveT1963 wrote:I am with PK here - not any one thing but lots of little things. I guess my #1 rule is to find where other hunters do not go - I spend a lot of time scouting each Jan-Mar and I eliminate a lot of ground based on hunter sign.



I follow a lot of what you post. To me it makes a lot of sense what you say. I have been finding a lot of hunter sign my question is how far are you going away from areas that you find other hunter sign ?


hard to say, some places 100 yards, others 2 miles.... only boots on the ground will tell ya for sure. I read a lot about lazy hunters and most wont get 1/4 mile from a road. That may be true in some areas but not where I hunt. but what is true is that there will be areas that get missed, over looked, etc. find those. Also, look for entries that the deer do not see often. 90% or more of the guys enter the same way. do it differently.
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Re: What’s so hard to understand?!

Unread postby BBH1980 » Tue Feb 26, 2019 6:34 am

DaveT1963 wrote:
BBH1980 wrote:
DaveT1963 wrote:I am with PK here - not any one thing but lots of little things. I guess my #1 rule is to find where other hunters do not go - I spend a lot of time scouting each Jan-Mar and I eliminate a lot of ground based on hunter sign.



I follow a lot of what you post. To me it makes a lot of sense what you say. I have been finding a lot of hunter sign my question is how far are you going away from areas that you find other hunter sign ?


hard to say, some places 100 yards, others 2 miles.... only boots on the ground will tell ya for sure. I read a lot about lazy hunters and most wont get 1/4 mile from a road. That may be true in some areas but not where I hunt. but what is true is that there will be areas that get missed, over looked, etc. find those. Also, look for entries that the deer do not see often. 90% or more of the guys enter the same way. do it differently.


Here in PA it holds true in big hill. Not much hunter sign after a certain elevation so I just eliminate that area. I have been planning for different access for sure. Basically I stay away from other hunters or look for overlooked areas then look for terrain features that promote bedding
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Re: What’s so hard to understand?!

Unread postby Lockdown » Tue Feb 26, 2019 7:02 am

greenhorndave wrote:
Lockdown wrote:
JAK wrote:
Lockdown wrote:That not all buck beds are created equal. It takes more than a good looking bed and a few rubs to make it hunt worthy. Most guys find a bed with a rub in it and get all antsy in their pantsy (I did when I first started) ;) but realistically a bed can look pretty worn with fairly minimal use. If a buck lays in it once or twice a month, and one decides to leave a rub, it’s going to make you lick your chops.

The best bedding areas have rubs from multiple years and lots of beds. The bedding areas that get used very consistently... those are the beds you want to concentrate on. And even then when you hunt the best it’s fairly common to not see anything. It’s all part of the game.

I would say I’m to the point where 10-20% of the buck beds I find get hunted. It takes a few years to really understand what you’re looking at. I’m certainly not “there” yet, but definitely better than when I started.

The best bedding areas I’ve found are hard to hunt. And that’s why they’re the best. Figuring out how to hunt them effectively might take some trial and error.

Learning Beast techniques is definitely a marathon and not a sprint. Pay attention to all the little details and KEEP AN OPEN MIND. The information you read here and watch in videos are guidelines, not gospel.

In 3-5 years you’ll be in pretty good shape as long as you’re putting forth the effort.

I would agree there. Probly 15 % of the spots ive scouted a truley worth hunting and i can see how a new beast cant let those type of spots string them along. I know when i first started i found a few beds and salavated at the mouth. But then thought to myself got to be better spots then this. And when u find one you know. Only way to find them is scout scout scout.


I agree.

A guy definitely doesn’t want to run out, find a bunch of spots you think are “good enough” then stop scouting if it’s still pre-green up. At the same time, if there’s a bed(ding area) that you aren’t sure is hunt worthy, I’d lean towards hunting it. Is the hunter stringing himself along on mediocre bedding? Maybe, maybe not.

It comes back to the instant gratification stuff that others have mentioned previously in this thread. A guy has to put his time in.

There’s nothing wrong with hunting a few questionable spots! That’s how you learn. Before long you’ll recognize that similar spots are mediocre and you can pass them by and not feel bad about it. I’ve said it a hundred times on the forum... any time you can answer a question, that’s a positive. I can’t stand questioning things. I want the answer and I want it now.

That said, Jak your 2nd to last sentence is spot on. “When you find one, you know.”. The good stuff should really get you excited. It will make perfect sense on an aerial, AND in the field.


The best bed I ever found was not visible on an aerial. It was a point into the cats that was almost imperceptible from the aerial. But like you said, once you saw it, all the tumblers fell into place and my brain-lock opened. The current occupant of the bed had little rubs in it, but there were larger older rubs in it too. It was a total mess to get to, even though it wasn't far off a road. I don't know if I'll see a big guy there, but I will try it. It was primary bedding.

I've pounded a lot of other ground and haven't found anything that good yet, although the snow and ice is obscuring the picture right now.

So here's a question, particularly for Lockdown, who is getting hammered with snow: Assuming snow cover of less than 8 inches, would you still go out and scout it, or wait for thaw? I'm seeing stuff that could be decent bedding, but it's under ice right now.

I feel like I'm getting the lay of the land scouting in Feb in SE WI, but I don't feel confident about nailing a specific bed. Rough areas, yes, but prime bed? No. I might not be in right spots either, but the conditions are leaving potentially more questions than answers.


If there is only 8” of snow and you’re not going to burn yourself out before the getting is good, I would speed scout. I’d hit up brand new properties and suspected bedding I’ve never been to on existing properties. That way you can get a good feel for what is going on, and can rule out bedding areas that are receiving too much hunting pressure. Being somewhat familiar with a property now is definitely an advantage when the snow melts.

I don’t think scouting is ever a total waste of time. With 8” of snow you can typically tell where trails and obvious beds are. If you’re paying close enough attention you could also find licking branches for scrapes.

The vast majority of the time I don’t pick my set ups the first time I walk into a bedding area anyway. I like to check it out first hand, then go home and make sense of it online. Then I go back and REALLY pick apart every bit of sign. I like to walk all the trails away from bedding, sometimes as far as 200 yards.

If a bedding area is giving me trouble I’ll go back a 3rd time. Even then I end up making a small adjustment the following year fairly often. Sometimes it’s 5 yards, sometimes it’s 40-50.

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