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A question about deer trails

Posted: Sun Sep 13, 2015 9:42 pm
by Divergent
I hunt mostly big woods...lots of wooded ridges with an elevation change of about 100-150 ft. I usually notice three beat down trails along most of them. They appear to be spaced about 20 yds apart. From your experiences...
Do all of the deer use each trail? Do the Bucks use the higher trails and does use the other two? Are they at different elevations because they lead from different beds? I've just recently learned about the thermal tunnels from this site and so now I'm wondering if the deer take different trails according to how strong a thermal is at different times of the day vs prevailing wind velocity. Anyone have any thoughts?

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Re: A question about deer trails

Posted: Mon Sep 14, 2015 3:16 am
by jonsimoneau
If you have multiple trails running parallel to each other along the side of a ridge, you can up your odds by finding where they merge somewhere along that side hill. I'm talking for a rut cruising type situation here. Preferably you will find the trails merging up the hill for more stable wind currents. Look for ditches running down the side of the ridge at a perpendicular angle. At the top is where these trails often converge. Here you have steady wind direction with minimal swirling and you have multiple trails coming together. If you do not have a situation where the trails merge then it is easy to make them merge by hing cutting a few trees to direct deer travel. If you decide to do this then try to route the deer to the higher trail rather than the lower. Again this way you can take advantage of more stable wind currents.

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Re: A question about deer trails

Posted: Mon Sep 14, 2015 9:02 am
by Divergent
jonsimoneau wrote:If you have multiple trails running parallel to each other along the side of a ridge, you can up your odds by finding where they merge somewhere along that side hill. I'm talking for a rut cruising type situation here. Preferably you will find the trails merging up the hill for more stable wind currents. Look for ditches running down the side of the ridge at a perpendicular angle. At the top is where these trails often converge. Here you have steady wind direction with minimal swirling and you have multiple trails coming together. If you do not have a situation where the trails merge then it is easy to make them merge by hing cutting a few trees to direct deer travel. If you decide to do this then try to route the deer to the higher trail rather than the lower. Again this way you can take advantage of more stable wind currents.

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Thanks for the input. That my plan for this season after buying the Hill Country Bucks dvd. Have you noticed a correlation with deer/times/trails?

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