Hunting Thick Cover Beds

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dan
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Re: Hunting Thick Cover Beds

Unread postby dan » Wed Aug 20, 2014 9:28 am

He would make the buck nervous but it did not just run away... Thinking the danger was up wind the buck snuck out the back door... Andrae is a master at that kind of stuff and does things like that a lot. One thing I have learned is don't walk straight at them, walk by at an angle so it don't look like you are heading for him, and don't stop walking or he will run... Don't always work, but in this case it got a buck that was not moving far enough in daylight to move, and to do so in the right direction.


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Singing Bridge
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Re: Hunting Thick Cover Beds

Unread postby Singing Bridge » Wed Aug 20, 2014 11:42 am

When using the Andrea tactic, what Dr. Nordberg referred to as a "gentle nudge", the bucks typically hold the bed until after dark or sneak out the back during the last half hour of daylight. My friends and I have killed a few different bucks by doing this in high pressure areas.

As far as what runway the bucks are using and when in heavy cover when you do not have prior knowledge, I recommend upping your game in the "track" department. Do a quick recon in nearby funnels that are close to bedding, but not so close as to bump the buck out. You need to be good at it and able to read subtle sign. Wait until midmorning to check, then set up to hunt THAT NIGHT based on your recon. The upwind trails from bedding are an area where you have to check very carefully and at as great of a distance as the terrain allows... the others are easier. Sounds aggressive and it is... you risk the buck holding until after dark. But if done properly it can position you in the right spot. With high pressure the bucks do not move much before dark, and you need to be on the right exit for an evening hunt. It pretty much doesn't matter how you hunt, within 24 hours I count on the buck knowing I was there and reacting to my presence even If I had hunted in a very conservative manner (which this isn't).

When you get good at tracking, there is no buck sign (including trail cameras) that can give you immediate intel on buck travel like tracks. They are available 24 / 7 and 365 days a year, and there are FEW hunters that are skilled in that area.
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Re: Hunting Thick Cover Beds

Unread postby KLEMZ » Thu Aug 21, 2014 10:00 am

Singing Bridge wrote:As far as what runway the bucks are using and when in heavy cover when you do not have prior knowledge, I recommend upping your game in the "track" department. Do a quick recon in nearby funnels that are close to bedding, but not so close as to bump the buck out. You need to be good at it and able to read subtle sign. Wait until midmorning to check, then set up to hunt THAT NIGHT based on your recon. The upwind trails from bedding are an area where you have to check very carefully and at as great of a distance as the terrain allows... the others are easier. Sounds aggressive and it is... you risk the buck holding until after dark. But if done properly it can position you in the right spot. With high pressure the bucks do not move much before dark, and you need to be on the right exit for an evening hunt. It pretty much doesn't matter how you hunt, within 24 hours I count on the buck knowing I was there and reacting to my presence even If I had hunted in a very conservative manner (which this isn't).

When you get good at tracking, there is no buck sign (including trail cameras) that can give you immediate intel on buck travel like tracks. They are available 24 / 7 and 365 days a year, and there are FEW hunters that are skilled



Holy Cow!! This is a GREAT nugget of buck hunting wisdom! I am copying it into my beast hunting notebook.

Question for Bridge or anyone with an opinion...Lets say you have 30 "shooter buck" bedding areas scouted. Lets say you only have 15 days in early season that you can hunt. Lets also assume you can't glass or shine or run trail cameras. Would it be a good idea to take your best guess on active bedding, approach your stand with maximum stealth while looking closely for fresh tracks, if you see tracks your golden. If you don't see tracks, back out and go to your next best close spot and set up. (even without obvious tracks because your short on time for that hunt)? Or, should you just trust your spring scouting and set up on a prime bed even without any fresh tracks visible on the way in?

My thinking is that if I have the time available, I should "scout" my way in and "call an audible" if I need to change the plan. I know Dan says mature bucks don't leave alot of sign, BUT... they have to leave tracks! If I don't see fresh tracks then I think i should just move tothe next bedding area and take my chances. (tracks or no tracks).

Opinions?
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Re: Hunting Thick Cover Beds

Unread postby Justin85 » Thu Aug 21, 2014 10:51 am

KLEMZ wrote:
Singing Bridge wrote:As far as what runway the bucks are using and when in heavy cover when you do not have prior knowledge, I recommend upping your game in the "track" department. Do a quick recon in nearby funnels that are close to bedding, but not so close as to bump the buck out. You need to be good at it and able to read subtle sign. Wait until midmorning to check, then set up to hunt THAT NIGHT based on your recon. The upwind trails from bedding are an area where you have to check very carefully and at as great of a distance as the terrain allows... the others are easier. Sounds aggressive and it is... you risk the buck holding until after dark. But if done properly it can position you in the right spot. With high pressure the bucks do not move much before dark, and you need to be on the right exit for an evening hunt. It pretty much doesn't matter how you hunt, within 24 hours I count on the buck knowing I was there and reacting to my presence even If I had hunted in a very conservative manner (which this isn't).

When you get good at tracking, there is no buck sign (including trail cameras) that can give you immediate intel on buck travel like tracks. They are available 24 / 7 and 365 days a year, and there are FEW hunters that are skilled



Holy Cow!! This is a GREAT nugget of buck hunting wisdom! I am copying it into my beast hunting notebook.

Question for Bridge or anyone with an opinion...Lets say you have 30 "shooter buck" bedding areas scouted. Lets say you only have 15 days in early season that you can hunt. Lets also assume you can't glass or shine or run trail cameras. Would it be a good idea to take your best guess on active bedding, approach your stand with maximum stealth while looking closely for fresh tracks, if you see tracks your golden. If you don't see tracks, back out and go to your next best close spot and set up. (even without obvious tracks because your short on time for that hunt)? Or, should you just trust your spring scouting and set up on a prime bed even without any fresh tracks visible on the way in?

My thinking is that if I have the time available, I should "scout" my way in and "call an audible" if I need to change the plan. I know Dan says mature bucks don't leave alot of sign, BUT... they have to leave tracks! If I don't see fresh tracks then I think i should just move tothe next bedding area and take my chances. (tracks or no tracks).

Opinions?


^^^ you have my attention. Waiting to hear the answer. Great question.

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dan
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Re: Hunting Thick Cover Beds

Unread postby dan » Thu Aug 21, 2014 10:56 am

KLEMZ wrote:
Singing Bridge wrote:As far as what runway the bucks are using and when in heavy cover when you do not have prior knowledge, I recommend upping your game in the "track" department. Do a quick recon in nearby funnels that are close to bedding, but not so close as to bump the buck out. You need to be good at it and able to read subtle sign. Wait until midmorning to check, then set up to hunt THAT NIGHT based on your recon. The upwind trails from bedding are an area where you have to check very carefully and at as great of a distance as the terrain allows... the others are easier. Sounds aggressive and it is... you risk the buck holding until after dark. But if done properly it can position you in the right spot. With high pressure the bucks do not move much before dark, and you need to be on the right exit for an evening hunt. It pretty much doesn't matter how you hunt, within 24 hours I count on the buck knowing I was there and reacting to my presence even If I had hunted in a very conservative manner (which this isn't).

When you get good at tracking, there is no buck sign (including trail cameras) that can give you immediate intel on buck travel like tracks. They are available 24 / 7 and 365 days a year, and there are FEW hunters that are skilled



Holy Cow!! This is a GREAT nugget of buck hunting wisdom! I am copying it into my beast hunting notebook.

Question for Bridge or anyone with an opinion...Lets say you have 30 "shooter buck" bedding areas scouted. Lets say you only have 15 days in early season that you can hunt. Lets also assume you can't glass or shine or run trail cameras. Would it be a good idea to take your best guess on active bedding, approach your stand with maximum stealth while looking closely for fresh tracks, if you see tracks your golden. If you don't see tracks, back out and go to your next best close spot and set up. (even without obvious tracks because your short on time for that hunt)? Or, should you just trust your spring scouting and set up on a prime bed even without any fresh tracks visible on the way in?

My thinking is that if I have the time available, I should "scout" my way in and "call an audible" if I need to change the plan. I know Dan says mature bucks don't leave alot of sign, BUT... they have to leave tracks! If I don't see fresh tracks then I think i should just move tothe next bedding area and take my chances. (tracks or no tracks).

Opinions?

Tracks are a great sign, but your going to find a lot of ground is hard and tracks are not noticable. In your scenario, I would look for rubs, tracks, browse, scat, scrapes, etc. Once your that close you burned the spot anyway, and if your only hunting 15 out of 30 I would suggest bumping the bedding area before moving. This will give you intel if the buck was there, you can look at the beds, and if he is there and you were wrong it will move him to one of the remaining beds, and your scent being there will likely stop him from moving there before your done with your 15 beds. In other words bump the beds your not hunting to stack the ones you are.
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Re: Hunting Thick Cover Beds

Unread postby KLEMZ » Thu Aug 21, 2014 4:08 pm

dan wrote:Tracks are a great sign, but your going to find a lot of ground is hard and tracks are not noticable. In your scenario, I would look for rubs, tracks, browse, scat, scrapes, etc. Once your that close you burned the spot anyway, and if your only hunting 15 out of 30 I would suggest bumping the bedding area before moving. This will give you intel if the buck was there, you can look at the beds, and if he is there and you were wrong it will move him to one of the remaining beds, and your scent being there will likely stop him from moving there before your done with your 15 beds. In other words bump the beds your not hunting to stack the ones you are.


Thanks for the info Dan. Really great common sense. It did not occur to me that I would be burning the bridge on that bedding area, so i may as well look at the bed itself and get recon for next time around. And stack the odds for the remaining beds. I like it!
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Re: Hunting Thick Cover Beds

Unread postby Stanley » Thu Aug 21, 2014 4:31 pm

Swampbuck wrote:
dan wrote:I remember Andrae hunting one of my areas once and shooting a huge buck we were after that had multiple exits coming from his bed by walking the upwind trails making noise somewhat in site of the bed and then hunting the down wind exit... Buck came sneaking in like clock work looking back over his shoulder.
Almost like doing his own drive.


How did he get setup downwind in time, I would have thought the buck would have snuck off immediately

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Some old bucks will hold tight if the bed has good cover. I have been within 5 yards of a bedded buck, rabbit hunting he held tight for at least 5 minutes. He finally lost nerve and busted out. If the buck thinks you have spotted him he will bolt. I saw a nice buck go into a huge bulldozed brush pile. He would not come out of there for nothing. I waited until dark and he stuck tight. Did not kill that buck.
You can fool some of the bucks, all of the time, and fool all of the bucks, some of the time, however you certainly can't fool all of the bucks, all of the time.
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Re: Hunting Thick Cover Beds

Unread postby Wlog » Fri Oct 31, 2014 6:50 am

Swampbuck wrote:What are your tactics for hunting and setting up on buck beds in thick cover

I've got a couple targets this year and they are in what i would call heavy cover. Visual no more than 10 yards or so from the beds. The trails are obvious out to about 25 yards and would be ideal to hunt but then they fizzle thorough the thicket and setting up inside of 25 yds seems extremely risky to me. the next best setups are 80-100 yds away.

So what do you guys do when setting up on beds in thick cover to optimize your chances at a shot

Image


One thing I didn't see mentioned here is barricading some of his exit routes to force him to use a trail you can kill him on. This way you can steer towards the easiest spot for you to access. I would do it in the winter and check back before season to make sure he's doing what you want him to then move in for the kill.

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Re: Hunting Thick Cover Beds

Unread postby checkerfred » Fri Oct 31, 2014 8:29 am

wow...these are some advanced tactics..I hope to one day be able to do this stuff. How long would you say a buck waits to return to a bed you disturbed? I know there are lots of variables and they don't always do the same thing.
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Re: Hunting Thick Cover Beds

Unread postby Buckfever » Fri Oct 31, 2014 10:40 am

Make the sets the year before hunt tight. Make the sets now come back late rut hunt tight. Cut the route in also.

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