Discuss this article on buck beds?

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PK_
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Discuss this article on buck beds?

Unread postby PK_ » Sun Dec 16, 2012 2:53 pm

How universal do you think this is? Do you think it applies to big woods? Heavy pressured areas? A lot of beds out there to sort out...

Link:
http://www.fieldandstream.com/articles/ ... g-near-you

Lazy? Here is the Article:

"Whitetail beds may seem unimpressive compared with hot scrapes and fresh rubs. But what they reveal can add plenty of excitement to your hunts—and possibly lead you to your biggest deer of the year. By mapping fresh deer beds on your property, you can learn exactly where bucks and does are feeding and resting—the keys to virtually any successful ambush, all season long. So grab an aerial photo, GPS, or topographic map and a notebook to jot down key insights, including the size, number, freshness, and smell of beds, as well as nearby sign. Then lace up your boots and start searching for the following beds.

Night Beds
Look for multiple beds of various sizes in places such as cropfields, food plots, oak flats, orchards, and natural woods clearings. You should see feeding sign nearby. These beds tell you where whitetail deer congregate at night, giving you a valuable starting point for a morning hunt and for locating daytime beds.

Doe Beds
Starting at the night beds you’ve already discovered, make loops into nearby brushy cover to pinpoint the daytime beds of doe family groups, including fawns and yearlings of both sexes. These beds should be clean and odor-free, with droppings of various sizes just a few feet away. The biggest doe beds will measure about 34 to 40 inches long, and the smaller fawn beds will be nearby.

Bachelor-Group Beds
In late summer and early fall, you’ll find these between one-quarter and three-quarters of a mile from night beds. Head uphill along hollows, ditches, and spur ridges to rugged terrain and pockets of dense cover, including blowdowns and brushy thickets. In flat terrain, check the heaviest cover and swampy areas.

Loner-Buck Beds
Search for these in the most isolated patches of the thickest cover, such as a rugged hollow choked with deadfalls from a windstorm, or in the most overlooked cover, such as a dense thicket along the farmer’s driveway. These spots will hold one reclusive buck—often a giant. Look for rubs on ankle-size trees nearby, as well as large droppings around or even in the bed.

Rutting-Buck Beds
When the first phases of the rut arrive in late October, bucks abandon their thick, remote bedding areas and camp out in doe territory. Now’s the time to head just downwind of the doe beds you pinpointed earlier and look for the large, rank-smelling, oval impressions of a single rutting buck. Watch for brand-new rubs to pop up nearby.

Winter Beds
When peak breeding ends, bucks and does will intermingle and bed close by but usually segregated by sex. Look for winter beds in evergreen stands, in thick, protected cover along stream bottoms, and on sun-soaked south- or southwest-facing slopes. Pay attention to the smallest doe beds; female fawns and yearlings often come into heat a month late. When they do, the area’s biggest bucks won’t be far off." - Gerald Almy

I'm sorry if someone already brought this article up but I did not find it under a search...


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Re: Discuss this article on buck beds?

Unread postby dirt nap giver » Sun Dec 16, 2012 3:26 pm

This is what is happening in my neck of the woods. I have yet to find a primary bed of a mature buck. I have laid some serious leather down looking for what is described in Dans videos and I just can't seem to pinpoint them. Although the "in season" beds that I am finding have 1 MAYBE 2 rubs in close proximity. It's almost as though he doesn't want to leave ANY sign on purpose. I have noted that other than the 1-2 rubs near the bed, there won't be another rub within 200-300 yards with similar characteristics of the one(s) right in the bed

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Re: Discuss this article on buck beds?

Unread postby BigHills BuckHunter » Sun Dec 16, 2012 6:10 pm

From what I have experienced he is right for the area I hunt. However this is hill country in Wisconsin on private land. Not sure if it would apply to heavy pressured public.

The author does good work on describing the beds, but does he go into to detail on how to hunt and kill the bucks from their beds? Finding a bed is only the first part of the eventual kill.

Dan says in his videos and on this site that the doe beds are a cluster usually in a circle pattern so they can look in all directions. Each one looks in a different direction to detect danger. While scouting I have found this to be very true. Thats how I look for doe beds now.
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Re: Discuss this article on buck beds?

Unread postby dan » Sun Dec 16, 2012 11:05 pm

Interesting article... One of Field & Streams writers called me yesterday to interview me for an article about how to hunt and scout beds... I am assuming it will be in there "deer issue" next fall.

This article seems to cover the basics. I have no idea if the writer knows more about bedding or not. A lot of the time the Magazines editors will cut an article down in size to make it fit print, or cut out certain parts that they think make the article boring. These guys are not always hunters... You also have a lot of writers that have to come up with articles on a constantly in order to make a living, so they search the internet for tactics, or habits to write about. That certainly don't make them an expert in that area...
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Re: Discuss this article on buck beds?

Unread postby Stanley » Mon Dec 17, 2012 5:24 am

I had a guy just this week ask me how to hunt a certain area. He said "he didn't know where the bucks were bedding or feeding". I think younger hunters don't understand the importance of those two ingredients. Anything they can read about beds could stimulate them. So in my opinion it is a good article.
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Re: Discuss this article on buck beds?

Unread postby PK_ » Mon Dec 17, 2012 7:26 am

Yes, I think the article is good and the author seems to know exactly what he is talking about. I don't doubt that. I am just wondering if things are that cut and dry for you guys when you find deer beds?

I don't have ag or topography where I hunt. To describe it, I guess it is like a mixture of flat big woods and open prairie with some swamps interspersed. Doe groups bed similarly to bucks. Almost always on the upwind side of water or on a high spot in a marsh. I find it incredibly hard to tell which beds belong to which deer in the herd when I come across them unoccupied. Sometimes it's obvious due to size of bed, number of beds, scat, spoor, tarsal scent or rubs but many times I am left scratching my head until I see a deer use the bed.

I think one common thread I have found in most of the beds that have ended up being buck beds is very good escape routes. A way for him to evacuate with out ever being vulnerable. Does bed in some very strategic spots to know when danger is coming, but then often bound out in the open after I bump them.

I have only been 'bed hunting' for a couple seasons, I guess I just have a lot of work ahead of me trying to sort it all out.
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Re: Discuss this article on buck beds?

Unread postby dan » Mon Dec 17, 2012 7:55 am

The differance between buck and doe beds gets discussed a lot on this forum...
Basically, does depend on a group defense. They bed in a circular pattern all watching a certain direction. Beds are a little less relient on certain wind directions. Beds are smaller, and fawn beds are usually present.
Buck bed are in an exact position, for an exact reason. They have to watch out for themselves. They position themselves in a spot where they have the best wind, sight, and/or hearing capabilities. When you look at a buck bed you say "wow, this is a great spot"
Thats not to say a lone doe won't bed there occasionally... but its a buck bed.
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Re: Discuss this article on buck beds?

Unread postby MOBIGBUCKS » Tue Dec 18, 2012 1:23 pm

dan wrote:The differance between buck and doe beds gets discussed a lot on this forum...
Basically, does depend on a group defense. They bed in a circular pattern all watching a certain direction. Beds are a little less relient on certain wind directions. Beds are smaller, and fawn beds are usually present.
Buck bed are in an exact position, for an exact reason. They have to watch out for themselves. They position themselves in a spot where they have the best wind, sight, and/or hearing capabilities. When you look at a buck bed you say "wow, this is a great spot"
Thats not to say a lone doe won't bed there occasionally... but its a buck bed.



Figured I would include this scouting pic of a classic doe bedding spot. Notice how the beds are in a circular fashion like dan was describing. Pretty cool isn't it! This is up on top of a ridge point and the deer have a definitive advantage bedding here.

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Re: Discuss this article on buck beds?

Unread postby Beason » Tue Dec 25, 2012 1:11 pm

This may be one of those "rut-buck" beds. This is downwind SE of known doe beds about 140 yards. To the west of this bed was that downwind doe rub line Dan talks about in his marsh video (I've gotten a lot of good trail cam pics off this feature). Small abandoned barn in the background.

BIG lone bed, he was facing into the wind judging by his leg imprints.

Image

Night doe bedding in "outside corner" of woodlot. Apparently they like to scrape the snow and or ground clean before bedding. There were a bunch of these along the woodlot line. Probably the same three deer.

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