Stand Entry

Discuss deer hunting tactics, Deer behavior. Post your Hunting Stories, Pictures, and Questions/Answers.
woody-san
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Stand Entry

Unread postby woody-san » Thu Jun 10, 2010 6:06 am

By now I know that stand entry is very critial if you're coming up on (a) deer that you know is bedded based on how the wind is blowing, where the deer can see/hear, etc. I've been thinking about it, if a deer is bedded and you're hunting an area that's within 100 yds or less of where's he's bedded, wouldn't you pretty much have to employ still hunting tactics the last few hundred yards or so of your entry? If it's a very dry fall day, with little wind, I would have to think it would take the utmost discipline to even reach your stand site, let alone actually get a shot at your quarry. What tactics do you use to get close on entry without making too much noise? Have you actually bumped the deer from the bed on your approach and how often does this happen?


woody-san
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Re: Stand Entry

Unread postby woody-san » Thu Jun 10, 2010 6:13 am

I guess I should add that I hunt forested hill country. Also, I know in the Marsh that you can be almost on top of them, but how far away from the actual bed would you say the typical stand site is in Hill Country?
dan
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Re: Stand Entry

Unread postby dan » Thu Jun 10, 2010 9:43 am

Each type of terrain is different, and even each bedding area is different. Getting close enough in hill country can be a difficult task because of leaves and branches and other noise makers.
Its really critical that you know where the buck is bedded, and hopfully you were in the beds in spring / winter scouting and really studied what the buck can see and hear. Its also important that you pay attention to doe and subordinate beds to ensure your stalk don't push other deer into your buck.
Its really a game of inches. To close and you send your buck running or sometimes they just lie there motionless till well after dark waiting till you leave. To far and you see the buck but do not get a daylight shot and have burned the bridge by getting your scent in there.
I generally hunt about twice as far back in Hill country than marsh or swamp. It is tough getting close.
The trade secrets would be things like accessing a stand site up a ravine cause they hold some of your noise and view.. Or with the bucks bedding the points figure which side of the point he is on based on the wind, and using the opposite side hill to keep a hill between you blocking noise and view. Learn to walk slow. Carefully place each footstep.
The ones that are really tough to get close you may want to hunt after a rain when the leaves are wet and don't make noise, or on a windy day to cover your approach ( most of the time the wind dies at prime time )
I would say I'm 150 to 200 yards back usually in the evening set ups.
The beds you cannot get anywhere close to in the evening would be the spots I would reserve for morning.
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Indianahunter
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Re: Stand Entry

Unread postby Indianahunter » Fri Jun 11, 2010 4:32 pm

One thing that I took from Hill Country Bucks and employed that wasn't even necessarily for stand entry was from Dan talking about Andre'. It was being patient enough to not hunt an area unless "Everything" is perfect. Last year I wanted to hunt this ridge that I knew a buck was bedding off the point. The wind was right for him to be bedded there, but it was one of those dry, crunchy debris covered ridges, and very calm. I knew there was absolutely NO WAY I was going to be able to sneak in there quiet enough. I waited about 4 days after a light rain and the right wind again and went in there very quietly. I did see the buck on his feet about 3:30 in the afternoon but never had a shot opportunity. However I felt it was one of my most successful hunts of the year. What a confidence builder. I think this was one of the most valuable tips on the video that beforehand I never even considered.
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Zap
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Re: Stand Entry

Unread postby Zap » Fri Jun 11, 2010 10:56 pm

Practicing with your sticks and stand so you are able to pull off a quiet set up cannot be overlooked. Also having a pretty good idea of what tree you will use can be a great help.

marty
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woody-san
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Re: Stand Entry

Unread postby woody-san » Tue Jun 15, 2010 5:03 am

Wow guys, thanks for the replies! That's all very helpful info. Most of the places I hunt are hardwood forests so the ground is always covered in noise makers. Looks like I need to put a top priority on how I'm going to get quietly into position if I want to even be in the game. One thing I'm starting to like doing is sneaking through a pine grove. One spot I hunted last year had a row of pines growing on the edge of a big stand of hardwoods. I was able to sneak up the pine row using the fallen needles as a nice quiet pathway. Hopefully I can find some more spots with pines nearby because those can always be traversed pretty quietly.
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Re: Stand Entry

Unread postby dan » Tue Jun 15, 2010 6:18 am

Woody, don't over look using the wind and terrain to block your noise too.
*Starting your approach midday when bucks are often not alert in there beds is a good idea.
*Giving yourself plenty of time instead of rushing to your destination is another great tactic.
*Carefully and slowly placing each footstep taking your time to look at the best path ahead of you...
* Noise will carry farther downwind than up wind so if the buck bed is up wind as it should be, some noise will be diverted.
* Noise don't go through hills very well. If your approach can keep dirt in between you and the buck it can keep some noise from hitting him as well as keeping him from seeing you.
* If you do break a branch or make a loud noise on accident freeze. Don't move for several minutes. Imagine your self in your treestand and you hear a branch break nearby. You suddenly become alert thinking it could be a big buck. You stair in that direction trying to catch a glimpse, or hear it again... But after several minutes you loose your interest and dismiss it as a squirrel or other critter and go back to daydreaming.. Bucks ain't much different except they are waiting and listening for hunters rather than prey.


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