Big game training

Elk, Moose, Pronghorn, African Game, ect. Behaviors, Hunting Stories, Pictures, Tactics, Q&A.
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Jackson Marsh
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Re: Big game training

Unread postby Jackson Marsh » Wed Jun 25, 2014 3:11 pm

Dewey wrote:
backstraps wrote:
Jackson Marsh wrote:[glow=red]Run, hill sprints, P90x, Insanity[/glow]. I hope to draw an elk tag next year and will have to crank it up a notch for that.

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DANG!!! Yeah this qualifies as "training" and staying in shape for hunting. If I were ever hunting near you, I know who to contact to help drag non the less hahaha

He "hires" help to drag his deer out........isn't that right Neil? ;) :lol:

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I have to "buy" my friends :lol: :lol: :lol:


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Dewey
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Re: Big game training

Unread postby Dewey » Wed Jun 25, 2014 3:33 pm

Jackson Marsh wrote:
Dewey wrote:
backstraps wrote:
Jackson Marsh wrote:[glow=red]Run, hill sprints, P90x, Insanity[/glow]. I hope to draw an elk tag next year and will have to crank it up a notch for that.

[ Post made via Android ] Image



DANG!!! Yeah this qualifies as "training" and staying in shape for hunting. If I were ever hunting near you, I know who to contact to help drag non the less hahaha

He "hires" help to drag his deer out........isn't that right Neil? ;) :lol:

[ Post made via iPhone ] Image




I have to "buy" my friends :lol: :lol: :lol:

As long as you keep dragging those marsh bucks out your OK with me. ;)

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bowhunter15
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Re: Big game training

Unread postby bowhunter15 » Thu Jun 26, 2014 1:41 am

Good topic. I had never trained specifically in the past for a hunt, though I was a three sport athlete in high school and was involved in track and field at the D1 college level. For a while I got very interested in distance training as well, and competed in a triathlon. I think too many guys try to model their training off of what they see others do, such as doing all endurance work because they see someone running marathons to train. I've hunted quite a bit of bluff country. It's not all a big endurance exercise. There are times when my heart rate remains stable but working. Though there are also times, going up short segments of a steep hill or climbing when my heart rate shoots way up, and I start breathing heavily and may feel a burn in the thighs (crossing certain thresholds into the anaerobic world and different energy systems) I never read a ton about strength training for hunting outside of some of Cam Hanes' stuff, but being strong really makes everything so much easier as long as your other ducks are in a row. So while my insight hasn't been proven in the mountains, here's how I'm setting up my training for my elk hunt this fall:
-Background/strengths: Explosiveness/plyometric capability, strength per bodyweight in core lifts
-Weaknesses: Aerobic Endurance, Anaerobic endurance, flexibility, balance
Back in the day, I would have added anaerobic endurance and balance to the strengths, but if you don't use it, you lose it. I've been lifting 3-5 days per week depending on the split and program. Instead of dropping that out, I reduce the total volume by cutting the number of sets in each exercise by 1 or 2. I've added balance and dynamic stretching to the warm up, and do more extensive static flexibility work after a lift. I've also started Hal Higdon's Novice half marathon plan, easily found by a Google search. My rule of thumb is that I can always substitute a run with a hilly hike with a loaded pack. It's good to start incorporating specific movement patterns, but I still treat it as endurance. If I start feeling myself slip into anaerobic (heavier breathing, muscle burn) I'll back off a bit. Heart rate monitors are helpful too. For anaerobic work (which typically can be improved upon extremely rapidly relative to strength or baseline endurance) I play a variety of rec sports throughout the year (soccer, flag football, softball). Closer to the trip, I'll add more hill runs. Example workouts (on a moderately sloping hill) might include 100m,150m,200m,150m,100m (walking back and started the next run right away) or 5x200m. The hill workouts they made us do in track were usually more intense and timed, but honestly, there's no point in striving for those numbers again without actual competition to prepare for.
keb
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Re: Big game training

Unread postby keb » Thu Jun 26, 2014 1:44 pm

The 7 mile humps I did with 40 and 50 pounds were brutal compared to running 15 or 20 miles, maybe not 20 but the only way to get good at anything is doing it, us flat landers don't have the luxury of mnts to hump.

On the flip side it is brutal to set in a tree stand from day light to dark, more brutal in my opinion.

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JoeRE
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Re: Big game training

Unread postby JoeRE » Fri Jun 27, 2014 12:51 pm

keb wrote:Been doing some training in the hills for here with 40 and 50 pounds in my pack, did a few 7 milers. Gonna do one 20 miler, in a few weeks, and one 20 mile run, about 3 weeks before I leave then do nothing maybe some light walking.

been doing some running 6,8 and 12 mile runs and tons of push ups.

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Thats funny to me and a good example of what bowhunter15 was talking about, everyone should utilize their strengths. Given the choice of running 20 miles or shooting myself I just might put a bullet in my head lol. I run but definitely have a wall at 10 miles I have never gotten past. Lots of -ups too...pushups pullups situps.

My brother who I go elk hunting with doesn't run, he just fills his pack and hikes up and down 300 foot Mississippi river bluffs. Elk country is nothing more than 4 of those bluffs stacked on top of each other :lol: We end up being able to do about the same amount in the mountains, lots of different ways to get it done.


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