Hunting Straight over beds in the morning in hill country

Discuss deer hunting tactics, Deer behavior. Post your Hunting Stories, Pictures, and Questions/Answers.
User avatar
Denisboyko22
Posts: 121
Joined: Tue Sep 10, 2019 5:47 pm
Location: Wisconsin
Contact:
Status: Offline

Re: Hunting Straight over beds in the morning in hill country

Unread postby Denisboyko22 » Tue Aug 18, 2020 11:12 am

Tennhunter3 wrote:
apersohn17 wrote:Long time lurker. So sorry if this is a dumb question.

What’s the difference between setting up early before sunrise and setting up early afternoon? Is it because they J hook when coming to their bed? Therefore most likely busting you?

Vs. in the evening they just get up and go straight to the food source?



Their is no dumb questions.
Their was a time most of us asked the same question.

When the sun is not up the air is cooling it creates thermal fall. Like pouring water onto the top of the hill it will flow down.
In hill country bucks bed often on ridgesides or points. So setting up high on the hill the thermal is dropping until the sun heats up the forest floor and creates rise.

Setting up am it's best to come in from below and setup near a creek that the falling thermal will blow into. Near where bucks j hook upto bed. The reason bucks j hook is to smell the bedding area before going to it. They often j hook into feeding areas also in the late afternoon or just after dark to smell them before going to eat.

In the afternoon bucks can leave different ways be it food ,does or water. The difference is when you setup in the afternoon the thermals are rising up to the highest spot. This makes entry and setup near bedding easier since bucks do not bed on the top elevation.

Thermals are constant they will do the same thing day after day. Some morning rainy days they may not rise till later in the day or fall earlier if it rains before dark. The heat of the Sun creates rise. In the afternoon when you get those shadows and the sun no longer is visible on the forest floor the thermals will switch from rising to falling.

The setup during Am is often at least a hundred yards difference from where you would setup in the afternoon due to thermals.

We sometimes try to setup in the bedding and get our thermal flowing away from where a buck may come from into bedding. That's what this thread is discussing. It can work but it often doesn't.

This particular thread is discussing hill country thermals. Marsh and water thermals are a totally different complicated issue you would need to talk to Dan or someone who hunts alot of that type of terrain for that information. I only know hill country and I stil make Alot of mistakes on my setups.


Honest question here, I thought thermals go up in the morning when the sun comes out and then after sun sets the thermals drop? Thats what I've experienced. But I get the opposite from what you said so idk if that just wasn't worded right or im reading this wrong :think: :lol:


Jdw
500 Club
Posts: 707
Joined: Thu Dec 29, 2016 9:00 am
Location: SE Ohio
Status: Offline

Re: Hunting Straight over beds in the morning in hill country

Unread postby Jdw » Tue Aug 18, 2020 11:50 am

Denisboyko22 wrote:
Tennhunter3 wrote:
apersohn17 wrote:Long time lurker. So sorry if this is a dumb question.

What’s the difference between setting up early before sunrise and setting up early afternoon? Is it because they J hook when coming to their bed? Therefore most likely busting you?

Vs. in the evening they just get up and go straight to the food source?



Their is no dumb questions.
Their was a time most of us asked the same question.

When the sun is not up the air is cooling it creates thermal fall. Like pouring water onto the top of the hill it will flow down.
In hill country bucks bed often on ridgesides or points. So setting up high on the hill the thermal is dropping until the sun heats up the forest floor and creates rise.

Setting up am it's best to come in from below and setup near a creek that the falling thermal will blow into. Near where bucks j hook upto bed. The reason bucks j hook is to smell the bedding area before going to it. They often j hook into feeding areas also in the late afternoon or just after dark to smell them before going to eat.

In the afternoon bucks can leave different ways be it food ,does or water. The difference is when you setup in the afternoon the thermals are rising up to the highest spot. This makes entry and setup near bedding easier since bucks do not bed on the top elevation.

Thermals are constant they will do the same thing day after day. Some morning rainy days they may not rise till later in the day or fall earlier if it rains before dark. The heat of the Sun creates rise. In the afternoon when you get those shadows and the sun no longer is visible on the forest floor the thermals will switch from rising to falling.

The setup during Am is often at least a hundred yards difference from where you would setup in the afternoon due to thermals.

We sometimes try to setup in the bedding and get our thermal flowing away from where a buck may come from into bedding. That's what this thread is discussing. It can work but it often doesn't.

This particular thread is discussing hill country thermals. Marsh and water thermals are a totally different complicated issue you would need to talk to Dan or someone who hunts alot of that type of terrain for that information. I only know hill country and I stil make Alot of mistakes on my setups.


Honest question here, I thought thermals go up in the morning when the sun comes out and then after sun sets the thermals drop? Thats what I've experienced. But I get the opposite from what you said so idk if that just wasn't worded right or im reading this wrong :think: :lol:


On a normal day the morning thermals fall until the sun warms the ground and air so there is a period of time early before they switch that the thermals are falling.
Unless the buck is late coming back to the bedding area you have to take falling thermals into account.
Tennhunter3
500 Club
Posts: 5460
Joined: Tue Dec 09, 2014 12:54 pm
Location: Medon Tn
Status: Online

Re: Hunting Straight over beds in the morning in hill country

Unread postby Tennhunter3 » Tue Aug 18, 2020 1:31 pm

Denisboyko22 wrote:
Tennhunter3 wrote:
apersohn17 wrote:Long time lurker. So sorry if this is a dumb question.

What’s the difference between setting up early before sunrise and setting up early afternoon? Is it because they J hook when coming to their bed? Therefore most likely busting you?

Vs. in the evening they just get up and go straight to the food source?



Their is no dumb questions.
Their was a time most of us asked the same question.

When the sun is not up the air is cooling it creates thermal fall. Like pouring water onto the top of the hill it will flow down.
In hill country bucks bed often on ridgesides or points. So setting up high on the hill the thermal is dropping until the sun heats up the forest floor and creates rise.

Setting up am it's best to come in from below and setup near a creek that the falling thermal will blow into. Near where bucks j hook upto bed. The reason bucks j hook is to smell the bedding area before going to it. They often j hook into feeding areas also in the late afternoon or just after dark to smell them before going to eat.

In the afternoon bucks can leave different ways be it food ,does or water. The difference is when you setup in the afternoon the thermals are rising up to the highest spot. This makes entry and setup near bedding easier since bucks do not bed on the top elevation.

Thermals are constant they will do the same thing day after day. Some morning rainy days they may not rise till later in the day or fall earlier if it rains before dark. The heat of the Sun creates rise. In the afternoon when you get those shadows and the sun no longer is visible on the forest floor the thermals will switch from rising to falling.

The setup during Am is often at least a hundred yards difference from where you would setup in the afternoon due to thermals.

We sometimes try to setup in the bedding and get our thermal flowing away from where a buck may come from into bedding. That's what this thread is discussing. It can work but it often doesn't.

This particular thread is discussing hill country thermals. Marsh and water thermals are a totally different complicated issue you would need to talk to Dan or someone who hunts alot of that type of terrain for that information. I only know hill country and I stil make Alot of mistakes on my setups.


Honest question here, I thought thermals go up in the morning when the sun comes out and then after sun sets the thermals drop? Thats what I've experienced. But I get the opposite from what you said so idk if that just wasn't worded right or im reading this wrong :think: :lol:



Thermals only go up the morning when the sun hits the forest floor. Usually 8-9am or so. It's not a set time. Can also change based on cloud cover or rain.
When you enter the woods at first light the thermals are falling.
Never give up Freedom for imagined safety.
User avatar
Denisboyko22
Posts: 121
Joined: Tue Sep 10, 2019 5:47 pm
Location: Wisconsin
Contact:
Status: Offline

Re: Hunting Straight over beds in the morning in hill country

Unread postby Denisboyko22 » Tue Aug 18, 2020 3:07 pm

Tennhunter3 wrote:
Denisboyko22 wrote:
Tennhunter3 wrote:
apersohn17 wrote:Long time lurker. So sorry if this is a dumb question.

What’s the difference between setting up early before sunrise and setting up early afternoon? Is it because they J hook when coming to their bed? Therefore most likely busting you?

Vs. in the evening they just get up and go straight to the food source?



Their is no dumb questions.
Their was a time most of us asked the same question.

When the sun is not up the air is cooling it creates thermal fall. Like pouring water onto the top of the hill it will flow down.
In hill country bucks bed often on ridgesides or points. So setting up high on the hill the thermal is dropping until the sun heats up the forest floor and creates rise.

Setting up am it's best to come in from below and setup near a creek that the falling thermal will blow into. Near where bucks j hook upto bed. The reason bucks j hook is to smell the bedding area before going to it. They often j hook into feeding areas also in the late afternoon or just after dark to smell them before going to eat.

In the afternoon bucks can leave different ways be it food ,does or water. The difference is when you setup in the afternoon the thermals are rising up to the highest spot. This makes entry and setup near bedding easier since bucks do not bed on the top elevation.

Thermals are constant they will do the same thing day after day. Some morning rainy days they may not rise till later in the day or fall earlier if it rains before dark. The heat of the Sun creates rise. In the afternoon when you get those shadows and the sun no longer is visible on the forest floor the thermals will switch from rising to falling.

The setup during Am is often at least a hundred yards difference from where you would setup in the afternoon due to thermals.

We sometimes try to setup in the bedding and get our thermal flowing away from where a buck may come from into bedding. That's what this thread is discussing. It can work but it often doesn't.

This particular thread is discussing hill country thermals. Marsh and water thermals are a totally different complicated issue you would need to talk to Dan or someone who hunts alot of that type of terrain for that information. I only know hill country and I stil make Alot of mistakes on my setups.


Honest question here, I thought thermals go up in the morning when the sun comes out and then after sun sets the thermals drop? Thats what I've experienced. But I get the opposite from what you said so idk if that just wasn't worded right or im reading this wrong :think: :lol:



Thermals only go up the morning when the sun hits the forest floor. Usually 8-9am or so. It's not a set time. Can also change based on cloud cover or rain.
When you enter the woods at first light the thermals are falling.

Just learned something I didn't know :D


  • Advertisement

Return to “Deer Hunting”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: Autiger, LukeTM, MitchB and 13 guests