New to timber company land

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deer365
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New to timber company land

Unread postby deer365 » Tue Aug 04, 2020 6:44 am

Since season went out last year I started scouting a new piece of public that is timber company land. It's roughly 14k acres of planted pines other than a few hardwoods they weren't allowed to cut.
Prior to this I've never hunted planted pines so I'm still new to this habitat and have a lot to learn. The terrain is mostly rolling hills here. Thru my research, scouting and what I've learned so far is to key in on any kind of subtle change. This change could be transition from old to mature pines, elevation change, change in timber types, etc.
I have also learned to scout the fire breaks and have found lots of sign along them. I've also learned to gravitate towards the thicker areas. Sometimes in these places it's almost impossible to be able to see out to 20' from the ground but once you get up in a tree you're able to see over the undergrowth and the visibility isn't as limited.
What else am I missing here? Am I on the right track here? Any advice is helpful this is my first year hunting timber company property and I'm still trying to figure out how to find the deer in these areas.


A5BLASTER
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Re: New to timber company land

Unread postby A5BLASTER » Tue Aug 04, 2020 10:13 am

I hunt wma's that are owned by timber company's and are mostly plantation pine stands with oaks down in the creeks just like what you described your hunting.

You sound like your headed down the right road but one thing I note is the fire breaks.

On the wma's I hunt. Fire breaks, powerlines, pipelines, hiking trails/ fourwheeler trails with sign are all night time sign.

Also what I will add, is the big mature pines often in my area if they cover a good sized area with very flat ground often what I will find is these lil small humps out in the middle of nowheres. These lil humps will often be growed up thick and the mature bucks really like bedding on them.

Hope this helps sir.
deer365
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Re: New to timber company land

Unread postby deer365 » Tue Aug 04, 2020 11:51 am

That helps a lot I will keep that in mind. Now the mature pines your talking about you'll have a flat area and basically just have nothing but pine straw on the ground and then yyou'll have a slight elevation changes that just forms a hump and you'll see a lot of undergrowth and thicker stuff on that hump?
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austin1990
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Re: New to timber company land

Unread postby austin1990 » Tue Aug 04, 2020 2:51 pm

deer365 wrote:That helps a lot I will keep that in mind. Now the mature pines your talking about you'll have a flat area and basically just have nothing but pine straw on the ground and then yyou'll have a slight elevation changes that just forms a hump and you'll see a lot of undergrowth and thicker stuff on that hump?

I haven't noticed thicker stuff growing on those humps in my area, but I do know deer like to travel them a lot if they can. I learned about them from my grandfather, hunting a place he had been a member of the lease for over 40 years. I was 15 or 16 and hunting with him and scouted a 2 year old pine cut over, that then had some short planted pines growing and he mentioned checking the "ridge" out in that cut over. I expected an actually ridge, but what is was just a little mound probably a foot higher than the surrounding area, 10 ft by 20 ft long. It was covered In tracks and he explained he had found that when he first started hunting there and deer, especially bucks liked to cross it. He said it gave them a better view point, but I think in the mornings it probably also helped pull thermals some on a calm day. Long story short we put up a ladder stand for me not far off and next morning I killed an 8 point chasing a doe across that "ridge" in the middle of that cut over.
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Re: New to timber company land

Unread postby A5BLASTER » Tue Aug 04, 2020 3:18 pm

deer365 wrote:That helps a lot I will keep that in mind. Now the mature pines your talking about you'll have a flat area and basically just have nothing but pine straw on the ground and then yyou'll have a slight elevation changes that just forms a hump and you'll see a lot of undergrowth and thicker stuff on that hump?


Yes.

Now keep in mind every pine plantation will have some things that are similar but they can and most likely will be very different.

Case in point one wma I hunt that's a hour drive from my house. The big mature pines that have been wind rowed stay thick as the hair on a dog. While the same types of pines planted and wind rowed on the wma close to my house is basicly a pine needle sea except for those lil humps and along the transitions of say where it borders a powerline or pipeline or where it meets up with the oaks of a creek bottom are a stand of pines that's younger are not been wind rowed yet.

Both wma's are alot alike but both are very diffrent in how the cover grows and how the deer use them.
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Re: New to timber company land

Unread postby deer365 » Wed Aug 05, 2020 1:39 pm

A5BLASTER wrote:
deer365 wrote:That helps a lot I will keep that in mind. Now the mature pines your talking about you'll have a flat area and basically just have nothing but pine straw on the ground and then yyou'll have a slight elevation changes that just forms a hump and you'll see a lot of undergrowth and thicker stuff on that hump?


Yes.

Now keep in mind every pine plantation will have some things that are similar but they can and most likely will be very different.

Case in point one wma I hunt that's a hour drive from my house. The big mature pines that have been wind rowed stay thick as the hair on a dog. While the same types of pines planted and wind rowed on the wma close to my house is basicly a pine needle sea except for those lil humps and along the transitions of say where it borders a powerline or pipeline or where it meets up with the oaks of a creek bottom are a stand of pines that's younger are not been wind rowed yet.

Both wma's are alot alike but both are very diffrent in how the cover grows and how the deer use them.


I've noticed that as well, I've scouted a couple different properties that were both planted pines and found that to be true. Let me ask you or anyone else for that matter on this thread, do you tend to stay away from creek bottoms? I know along your steep hillsides, creek bottoms and those areas that have hardwoods obviously is where your hard mast trees are going to be but to me I would think those get hammered by other hunters. What areas do you all find to be more productive? Thru my experiences scouting I've been keying in on transitions between different age pines, vegetation change (transitions from thicker cover to more open cover) and changes in different timber types.
deer365
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Re: New to timber company land

Unread postby deer365 » Wed Aug 05, 2020 1:42 pm

austin1990 wrote:
deer365 wrote:That helps a lot I will keep that in mind. Now the mature pines your talking about you'll have a flat area and basically just have nothing but pine straw on the ground and then yyou'll have a slight elevation changes that just forms a hump and you'll see a lot of undergrowth and thicker stuff on that hump?

I haven't noticed thicker stuff growing on those humps in my area, but I do know deer like to travel them a lot if they can. I learned about them from my grandfather, hunting a place he had been a member of the lease for over 40 years. I was 15 or 16 and hunting with him and scouted a 2 year old pine cut over, that then had some short planted pines growing and he mentioned checking the "ridge" out in that cut over. I expected an actually ridge, but what is was just a little mound probably a foot higher than the surrounding area, 10 ft by 20 ft long. It was covered In tracks and he explained he had found that when he first started hunting there and deer, especially bucks liked to cross it. He said it gave them a better view point, but I think in the mornings it probably also helped pull thermals some on a calm day. Long story short we put up a ladder stand for me not far off and next morning I killed an 8 point chasing a doe across that "ridge" in the middle of that cut over.

Thanks man. The "ridges" you're describing what does the cover look like in those areas? Do they tend to be thicker? More open? Or have you noticed that to be much of a difference? Or is it just the fact that it creates a vantage point for them and that's what they're more interested in?
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Re: New to timber company land

Unread postby A5BLASTER » Wed Aug 05, 2020 1:59 pm

deer365 wrote:
A5BLASTER wrote:
deer365 wrote:That helps a lot I will keep that in mind. Now the mature pines your talking about you'll have a flat area and basically just have nothing but pine straw on the ground and then yyou'll have a slight elevation changes that just forms a hump and you'll see a lot of undergrowth and thicker stuff on that hump?


Yes.

Now keep in mind every pine plantation will have some things that are similar but they can and most likely will be very different.

Case in point one wma I hunt that's a hour drive from my house. The big mature pines that have been wind rowed stay thick as the hair on a dog. While the same types of pines planted and wind rowed on the wma close to my house is basicly a pine needle sea except for those lil humps and along the transitions of say where it borders a powerline or pipeline or where it meets up with the oaks of a creek bottom are a stand of pines that's younger are not been wind rowed yet.

Both wma's are alot alike but both are very diffrent in how the cover grows and how the deer use them.


I've noticed that as well, I've scouted a couple different properties that were both planted pines and found that to be true. Let me ask you or anyone else for that matter on this thread, do you tend to stay away from creek bottoms? I know along your steep hillsides, creek bottoms and those areas that have hardwoods obviously is where your hard mast trees are going to be but to me I would think those get hammered by other hunters. What areas do you all find to be more productive? Thru my experiences scouting I've been keying in on transitions between different age pines, vegetation change (transitions from thicker cover to more open cover) and changes in different timber types.


For the most part I tend to stay away from the creek bottoms, except to access. Really only time I hunt on a creek bottom is if it's way way in the back. A lot further than most redbeards are willing to walk.
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austin1990
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Re: New to timber company land

Unread postby austin1990 » Wed Aug 05, 2020 2:30 pm

deer365 wrote:
austin1990 wrote:
deer365 wrote:That helps a lot I will keep that in mind. Now the mature pines your talking about you'll have a flat area and basically just have nothing but pine straw on the ground and then yyou'll have a slight elevation changes that just forms a hump and you'll see a lot of undergrowth and thicker stuff on that hump?

I haven't noticed thicker stuff growing on those humps in my area, but I do know deer like to travel them a lot if they can. I learned about them from my grandfather, hunting a place he had been a member of the lease for over 40 years. I was 15 or 16 and hunting with him and scouted a 2 year old pine cut over, that then had some short planted pines growing and he mentioned checking the "ridge" out in that cut over. I expected an actually ridge, but what is was just a little mound probably a foot higher than the surrounding area, 10 ft by 20 ft long. It was covered In tracks and he explained he had found that when he first started hunting there and deer, especially bucks liked to cross it. He said it gave them a better view point, but I think in the mornings it probably also helped pull thermals some on a calm day. Long story short we put up a ladder stand for me not far off and next morning I killed an 8 point chasing a doe across that "ridge" in the middle of that cut over.

Thanks man. The "ridges" you're describing what does the cover look like in those areas? Do they tend to be thicker? More open? Or have you noticed that to be much of a difference? Or is it just the fact that it creates a vantage point for them and that's what they're more interested in?

The few places I've noticed small ridges/high spots in pine plantations, clear cuts are just like the surrounding area, with no real difference in vegetation. Now in the flat hardwood river bottoms I hunt if ya find a ridge or high spot that's dry and not under water they will tend to be a little thicker with smaller trees and vegetation. Those are usually on one side of a slough bank, I think they're generally thicker cover because flood water doesnt drown the plants on top of it where as it will the smaller plants throughout the timber.
deer365
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Re: New to timber company land

Unread postby deer365 » Wed Aug 05, 2020 4:04 pm

A5BLASTER wrote:
deer365 wrote:
A5BLASTER wrote:
deer365 wrote:That helps a lot I will keep that in mind. Now the mature pines your talking about you'll have a flat area and basically just have nothing but pine straw on the ground and then yyou'll have a slight elevation changes that just forms a hump and you'll see a lot of undergrowth and thicker stuff on that hump?


Yes.

Now keep in mind every pine plantation will have some things that are similar but they can and most likely will be very different.

Case in point one wma I hunt that's a hour drive from my house. The big mature pines that have been wind rowed stay thick as the hair on a dog. While the same types of pines planted and wind rowed on the wma close to my house is basicly a pine needle sea except for those lil humps and along the transitions of say where it borders a powerline or pipeline or where it meets up with the oaks of a creek bottom are a stand of pines that's younger are not been wind rowed yet.

Both wma's are alot alike but both are very diffrent in how the cover grows and how the deer use them.


I've noticed that as well, I've scouted a couple different properties that were both planted pines and found that to be true. Let me ask you or anyone else for that matter on this thread, do you tend to stay away from creek bottoms? I know along your steep hillsides, creek bottoms and those areas that have hardwoods obviously is where your hard mast trees are going to be but to me I would think those get hammered by other hunters. What areas do you all find to be more productive? Thru my experiences scouting I've been keying in on transitions between different age pines, vegetation change (transitions from thicker cover to more open cover) and changes in different timber types.


For the most part I tend to stay away from the creek bottoms, except to access. Really only time I hunt on a creek bottom is if it's way way in the back. A lot further than most redbeards are willing to walk.


Thanks, that was my thoughts also.
deer365
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Re: New to timber company land

Unread postby deer365 » Wed Aug 05, 2020 4:05 pm

austin1990 wrote:
deer365 wrote:
austin1990 wrote:
deer365 wrote:That helps a lot I will keep that in mind. Now the mature pines your talking about you'll have a flat area and basically just have nothing but pine straw on the ground and then yyou'll have a slight elevation changes that just forms a hump and you'll see a lot of undergrowth and thicker stuff on that hump?

I haven't noticed thicker stuff growing on those humps in my area, but I do know deer like to travel them a lot if they can. I learned about them from my grandfather, hunting a place he had been a member of the lease for over 40 years. I was 15 or 16 and hunting with him and scouted a 2 year old pine cut over, that then had some short planted pines growing and he mentioned checking the "ridge" out in that cut over. I expected an actually ridge, but what is was just a little mound probably a foot higher than the surrounding area, 10 ft by 20 ft long. It was covered In tracks and he explained he had found that when he first started hunting there and deer, especially bucks liked to cross it. He said it gave them a better view point, but I think in the mornings it probably also helped pull thermals some on a calm day. Long story short we put up a ladder stand for me not far off and next morning I killed an 8 point chasing a doe across that "ridge" in the middle of that cut over.

Thanks man. The "ridges" you're describing what does the cover look like in those areas? Do they tend to be thicker? More open? Or have you noticed that to be much of a difference? Or is it just the fact that it creates a vantage point for them and that's what they're more interested in?

The few places I've noticed small ridges/high spots in pine plantations, clear cuts are just like the surrounding area, with no real difference in vegetation. Now in the flat hardwood river bottoms I hunt if ya find a ridge or high spot that's dry and not under water they will tend to be a little thicker with smaller trees and vegetation. Those are usually on one side of a slough bank, I think they're generally thicker cover because flood water doesnt drown the plants on top of it where as it will the smaller plants throughout the timber.

Gotcha, appreciate it.


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