thermal drop

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Mathewshooter
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Re: thermal drop

Unread postby Mathewshooter » Tue Dec 24, 2019 12:11 pm

Does this happen no matter how big the elevation change? Will it always seek its lowest point?
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Re: thermal drop

Unread postby Mopar1169 » Tue Dec 24, 2019 1:40 pm

How do you handle thermal drop on a deer when it doesn't leave the area that the thermals are dropping to till after dark?

I had a bowl I was hunting in Nebraska that came off the side of a lake it was about 140 yards wide and dropped about 50 feet on 3 sides leading down the lake. In the center was a gradual rise up to the top. Both sides were a steep drop. In the center was flat before it drop down another 50 feet to the lake itself.

I was set up on the top 1/3 with the wind blowing straight off the lake. I was sitting on the ground all red cedars no trees to get in. I guess I got lucky on this hunt because a very large 10 point came up out of the bedding area at 4 pm passed by at 70 yards and rebedded above me 90 yards away. He laid there for two hours then reappeared 30 minutes before dark milled around for about 15 minutes then rebedded. Right at dark he headed out in a direction I wasn't expecting and never got a shot. I know now I should of used the time he gave me to reposition to make the shot. But it was raining and I couldn't get my optics clean enough to see exactly where he was bedding. Was afraid of spooking him.

I guess my question is there a better way to handle a spot like that were you know he isn't going to leave the thermal pull area until after dark? Thanks.
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Re: thermal drop

Unread postby dan » Tue Dec 24, 2019 1:48 pm

Mathewshooter wrote:Does this happen no matter how big the elevation change? Will it always seek its lowest point?

The thermal force goes down as steep elevation levels. Ive noticed some drop on 10 foot elevations when calm, but have also noticed a strong breeze on steep hills. The closer to flat the better. But, the steeper the more predictable on the direction.
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Re: thermal drop

Unread postby dan » Tue Dec 24, 2019 1:53 pm

Mopar1169 wrote:How do you handle thermal drop on a deer when it doesn't leave the area that the thermals are dropping to till after dark?

I had a bowl I was hunting in Nebraska that came off the side of a lake it was about 140 yards wide and dropped about 50 feet on 3 sides leading down the lake. In the center was a gradual rise up to the top. Both sides were a steep drop. In the center was flat before it drop down another 50 feet to the lake itself.

I was set up on the top 1/3 with the wind blowing straight off the lake. I was sitting on the ground all red cedars no trees to get in. I guess I got lucky on this hunt because a very large 10 point came up out of the bedding area at 4 pm passed by at 70 yards and rebedded above me 90 yards away. He laid there for two hours then reappeared 30 minutes before dark milled around for about 15 minutes then rebedded. Right at dark he headed out in a direction I wasn't expecting and never got a shot. I know now I should of used the time he gave me to reposition to make the shot. But it was raining and I couldn't get my optics clean enough to see exactly where he was bedding. Was afraid of spooking him.

I guess my question is there a better way to handle a spot like that were you know he isn't going to leave the thermal pull area until after dark? Thanks.

Its all about either waiting for the right day when he will move far enough, or finding a kink in his armor where you can drop the scent down where he dont go, or get him when he moves off to the side. Sometimes there areas are pretty well set up and it takes going out side the box. Like maybe bumping him to the shooter, or relocating him to where you can shoot him. They are pretty good at picking great bedding locations.
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Re: thermal drop

Unread postby Mopar1169 » Tue Dec 24, 2019 4:06 pm

dan wrote:
Mopar1169 wrote:How do you handle thermal drop on a deer when it doesn't leave the area that the thermals are dropping to till after dark?

I had a bowl I was hunting in Nebraska that came off the side of a lake it was about 140 yards wide and dropped about 50 feet on 3 sides leading down the lake. In the center was a gradual rise up to the top. Both sides were a steep drop. In the center was flat before it drop down another 50 feet to the lake itself.

I was set up on the top 1/3 with the wind blowing straight off the lake. I was sitting on the ground all red cedars no trees to get in. I guess I got lucky on this hunt because a very large 10 point came up out of the bedding area at 4 pm passed by at 70 yards and rebedded above me 90 yards away. He laid there for two hours then reappeared 30 minutes before dark milled around for about 15 minutes then rebedded. Right at dark he headed out in a direction I wasn't expecting and never got a shot. I know now I should of used the time he gave me to reposition to make the shot. But it was raining and I couldn't get my optics clean enough to see exactly where he was bedding. Was afraid of spooking him.

I guess my question is there a better way to handle a spot like that were you know he isn't going to leave the thermal pull area until after dark? Thanks.

Its all about either waiting for the right day when he will move far enough, or finding a kink in his armor where you can drop the scent down where he dont go, or get him when he moves off to the side. Sometimes there areas are pretty well set up and it takes going out side the box. Like maybe bumping him to the shooter, or relocating him to where you can shoot him. They are pretty good at picking great bedding locations.


Thanks for explantation. Will have to try some different stuff if I make it back out there next year.
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Re: thermal drop

Unread postby Jackson Marsh » Tue Dec 24, 2019 4:57 pm

8-)

I’m sorry you lost the fight with the cat....get'em next time.
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Re: thermal drop

Unread postby tgreeno » Wed Dec 25, 2019 3:35 am

I'm not a big hill country guy. So I assume the better plan is to hunt to the NE of that stand in your map scenario? Along the side of the hill so your scent is traveling north the trail coming up.
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Re: thermal drop

Unread postby Twenty Up » Wed Dec 25, 2019 4:05 am

29DA04AC-5587-41B2-8EDA-BE10C1B2DCA5.jpeg


Not trying to hijack, but this is what I used to shoot my target buck this November. Maybe the visual helps others better understand how you can utilize topography and thermals.

Let’s assume there’s food to the North, bedding to the South in the image above.

Red: doe trails
Green: Food
Orange: Bedding
Black: Where I anticipated buck cruising sign (can be going parallel or down ridge)
Purple: Buck cruising Trail
Blue Dot: My Stand
Blue Arrows: Wind & Thermal drop

The most crucial part of this setup is to hunt on the opposite side of the ridge where the deer are coming and finding the trail they’re going to cross over. Any deer below you will wind you in the mornings.

Full disclosure I’ve never been to the area pictured, but it lays similar to what I hunted successfully. There’s more deer trails on other ridges, but when I’m hunting I find it better to focus and hunt one or two specific trails than trying to hunt them all. The bedding and trails aren’t exact, just to put in better context how/where I’d try to intercept.
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Re: thermal drop

Unread postby Chuck B » Wed Dec 25, 2019 4:42 am

Dan, I believe in your video you are referencing the evening thermals most is the time. Correct? Just want to make sure that people new to thermals understand the difference.
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